Followership

The appetite for books on leadership and management is now so great that many, if not most, have the sexier of the two words, leadership, right in the title – and that’s the problem with leadership today. Leaders in the workplace are always aiming to achieve the benefits, stature and even glamour of being a “real” leader – the person who calls all the shots and creates a visionary plan to boost revenues.

How can you blame them? It’s all they’ve ever read about. It’s all they ever see in the workplace. Perhaps it’s even the behaviour you project as a leader yourself.

Being the stereotypical leader is the easiest way to stand out, the easiest way to be noticed, and the easiest way to move up. Everyone speaks that language.

Who would want to be a follower anyway?

The Fact is leadership, as we know it, is about the individual. It’s about guiding the sheep, if you can put it in those words.

The Problem is that this idea of leadership leaves out the contributions of many others. Worse, it blocks leaders from noticing other leaders.

The Outcome is a company that becomes dependent on the ideas, values and direction of a single person, or group of powerful leaders.

The Solution is to consider the less glamorous role of followers in your organization and assess their condition. Are they detached? Will they question your leadership? Will they follow you in every action you take?

Followership talks about a similar concept. The people you’re leading can play vital roles in organizing smaller projects, smaller groups and smaller ideas. They can mobilize entire components of your vision, or they can be ignored and become isolated and detached. Just because they don’t stand out, doesn’t mean they should be disregarded.

You know exactly who these people are. They are the implementers. Those who sit quietly in meetings, gather all the information, and spring into action when the plan is set.

They are everywhere. You see them every day. But, they don’t scream individualism.

They may not come up with the latest and greatest ideas, but this doesn’t mean they don’t have the power to guide the fortunes of your organization.

Followers are important. Are you paying attention to them?