Tag Archives: business leader

why culture and leadership matter for disruptive innovation

Global Communications

I came across a short, but very interesting article on smartblogs.com entitled “Why culture and leadership matter for disruptive innovation”, written by James daSilva. It begins with some slightly radical, but excellent advice – daSilva suggests you should bring in “troublemakers and tinkerers”.

Fantastic!

When talking to leaders about transformational change in their organizations, or any movement in new directions for that matter, I tell them they have to get comfortable with the concept of creative tension. I encourage them to seek out and embrace people with starkly different views, the deviants as it were, and really fan the sparks of new and creative thinking.

It all reminds me of a book I enjoyed years ago entitled “The Corporate Fool”. The author, David Firth, tells you up front that “one of the premises of this book is that sanity is tremendously limiting”. He proposes that the Fool is the perfect role model for the paradoxical and crazy thinking that is needed, and for being the person who is not afraid to speak up. Might this be the troublemaker or the tinkerer or even the deviant by another name?

click here to check out the blog

the authenticity paradox

Authenticiteit

Imagine speaking to a room full of aspiring business leaders. You ask “who of you wish to be an authentic leader”? Of course, you picture hands raising as very few of us wish to be perceived as disingenuous or insincere, in either our business or personal lives. In a time where authenticity has become a gold standard for leadership, however, it is important to understand the inherent paradox, a tipping point at which too much authenticity, or rather a too limited definition and understanding of what is required in order to be an authentic leader, can hinder both your credibility, as well as your organizational impact and leadership success.

So, when exactly does rigid adherence to the pursuit of authenticity turn into a stumbling block to successful leadership?

First and foremost, true leadership almost always requires us to step out of our comfort zone, take risks, and challenge ourselves and others around us to grow, adapt, improve and change. As a leader, you may regularly be forced to choose between the self you are today, and how you are comfortable doing things, and the self you could be tomorrow, stretching, growing, and leading yourself, your team, or your organization down a new and more successful path. Choosing to remain true to your current self may feel more authentic in the short-term, but growing and changing are integral aspects of leadership. Understanding that growing and changing do not compromise your authenticity is crucial. Personal growth needs to be appreciated as key component of authenticity.

Successful leadership also requires us to inspire others and generate confidence in those who work around us. Blanket self-disclosure and transparency of your every thought, feeling, and insecurity may feel like a very authentic way of leading, but too much disclosure of uncertainty can undermine your team’s confidence in you as a leader. There are few certainties in life, and, as a leader, it is your job to regularly weigh information in order to determine a course of action and then confidently lead others through it, while remaining open to necessary changes as circumstances require. Telling your employees they are an integral component of the team’s success may be both positive and authentic, however, telling a new team that you’re depending on them because you have no idea what you are doing is going too far.

Finally, selling yourself, your visions, and your ideas are another integral component to leadership success. The act of doing this, however, can feel forced and unauthentic to some people, so much so that they avoid doing so at all costs, hoping their work will speak for itself and have the impact they wish it to. This is a naïve and ineffective ideal that can impede leadership and team success. As leaders, we need to understand and accept that the promotion of our ideas, and the act of influencing others, are not selfish pursuits, but ways to create collective team and organizational successes.

For more interesting insight into The Authenticity Paradox read the full HBR article below:

read here

The Succession Planning Pitfall

Job-promotion-200x266

No one wants to be accused of being unidimensional, and that of course goes for managers and leadership teams as well. But when conducting succession planning meetings, or creating future organization charts, leadership teams are often just that. Candidates for leadership roles are evaluated based on their performance only, and little to no consideration is given to the potential they demonstrate for success in these roles.

I recently read an article titled “Why Your Best Performers Usually Make the Worst Leaders”, and it reminded me once again of this very common pitfall. You can read the article here – http://www.tlnt.com/2014/10/07/why-your-best-performers-usually-make-the-worst-leaders/. In this case, the author is commenting on the common, but misguided practice of promoting good performers into leadership roles as a means to justify a higher salary, and advocating instead the simple solution of keeping them in their role and just awarding the pay increase. What the article also does, is highlight the lack of rigour most organizations demonstrate in identifying leadership potential.

Opportunity Sensing

In business, we are not particularly good at the kind of singular focus required to take full advantage of pivot points or strategic inflection points when they occur. It often seems we feel the need to mitigate absolutely all of the natural risks associated with a big decision. As a result, we never quite make the commitment necessary to take full advantage of the situation. Instead, we carefully hedge our bets, rather than aggressively pursuing our options and, in the process, we limit the full scope of the opportunity we have.

Opportunity sensing is about taking advantage of the discontinuities when they appear. Opportunity sensing is about staking a claim on an unknown piece of land. Opportunity sensing is knowing, deep in your bones, that what you are about to do just feels right. The leader who can get comfortable with this new way of thinking is the one who will be able to take maximum advantage of the opportunities resident in the state of disequilibrium in which we find ourselves today.

Seismic Shifts

One of the many transformational leadership competencies required to successfully navigate the future is contextual intelligence. Contextual Intelligence is the ability to sense subtle shifts in the environment, to become aware of those changes before anyone else and to predict their likely implications going forward. It is the ability to put things into crystal clear perspective and then accurately frame the picture so others can understand it. Naturally, there is then the need to communicate the picture in a way that others can grasp and comfortably relate to.

The Important Role of Dissatisfaction

In the modern organization, the leader must play the active role of chief disorganizer or chief agitator, rather than the passive role of chief organizer. If the top leader is not modelling this type behaviour, it will not be seen as an essential responsibility of the leaders and employees below. Leaders, at all levels, must be encouraged to seek the truth, identify the gaps, call out the misalignments and propel themselves forward with the help of a burning, urgent dissatisfaction with the status quo.

These are times for truly transformational leaders, not bookkeepers, analysts and organizational mechanics whose skills are limited to maintaining the status quo. Transformational leaders, by their very nature, are wired and motivated differently; they operate according to a different agenda. Their core leadership philosophy is deeply rooted in a complex combination of their chronic dissatisfaction with the way things are and a fervent belief that things can be better.