Tag Archives: credibility

a few words on the passing of Satoru Iwata

2015.07.16_a few words on the passing of Satoru Iwata

Many of us come into this world with the luxury of choice. In a sense, we control our own destinies, or at least a good portion of us actively try to, by choosing our investments in education, the jobs we take, the places we live, the people we include (or exclude) from our lives, how we spend our time and resources. We consume and acquire each day, steered by the numerous personal and professional decisions we make.

One choice that alludes us, however – no matter how rich or famous we are, or how important we are to the world, or how much more we still have to offer – is how and when our life might end. Steve jobs could have told you this. And Satoru Iwata, CEO of Nintendo, who just passed away at 55 years old, could have told you this. Cancer doesn’t care if you are a CEO. It doesn’t care if you are 40 years too young to die, or even 80 for that matter. It doesn’t care if you are an innovator, a blue ocean thinker, a transformational leader, or a good human being, and by all accounts, Mr. Iwata was all of the above.

“There are CEOs who make a difference to the lives of the people – Satoru Iwata was one of the few who did” tweeted Min-Liang Tan, the CEO of Razer Inc. This sentiment is reflected and repeated in numerous articles, tweets, and commentaries that allude to Iwata’s legacy as being not only his contribution to the success of Nintendo, but also to his character as a leader, his humility and dedication, his sense of humour, and the connections he made with both customers and employees.

I’ve included just a handful of these messages below and, as you read them, I encourage you to take a moment to consider what your legacy as a leader might be? What might be written about your character, your commitment, or your connections to customers and employees? What changes might you want to make in order to be remembered as a truly great leader?

read here

dealing with backlash for making unpopular decisions

cbc

When the story of Jian Ghomeshi’s firing from the CBC first crept into public consciousness, initial responses to Ghomeshi’s now viral Facebook plea included no small amount of public outrage directed towards the CBC for seeming to meddle into people’s private lives where they didn’t belong. Indeed, many fans were quick to condemn the CBC’s decision to act so decisively with little public explanation provided. At that time, I was struck with the question of how organizations can make such monumentally difficult decisions, such as firing a popular and respected employee, without being damned if they do and damned if they don’t? Just a month prior, a similar outrage had been directed towards the NFL, who by all accounts took the opposite approach of the CBC, by not taking swift or strong action against player Ray Rice, even when privately confronted with evidence of egregious violent behaviour in his personal life. The organization was eventually publically shamed into taking action. I was left to consider how the Canadian public would feel if, a month from now, it had come out that the CBC was in possession of evidence of violent or criminal behaviour, and chosen to not take the immediate and final action they had. Firing their star player was the last decision the CBC would have ever wanted to deal with, given the immense initial backlash they could have predicted would ensue. As more information began to infiltrate the public sphere, however, all indications were it was the absolutely right, if not immediately popular decision to make.

Challenges for the Modern Leader

Challenges for the Modern Leader #5: Say/Do Ratio

This week, I am proposing 5 challenges facing modern leaders, and the respective competencies needed to face each challenge. If you like a specific post, please ‘like/favourite/share’ it. The post with the most amount of engagements will earn a follow up post outlining HOW TO DEVELOP COMPETENCIES RELATED TO THAT POST.

Say/Do Ratio

This is pretty self explanatory, but often overlooked by management teams. If a leader’s say/do ratio is less than 1:1, that leader is in trouble. There are few things that damage credibility more than not following through on something you said you would do.

Modern leaders, keep this in mind. Don’t commit to an action unless you’re positive it can be completed. Don’t make false promises.

Interested in more information on maintaing a 1:1 say/do ratio? Like this post on Facebook or Twitter to warrant a detailed follow up post!

5 Challenges for the Modern Leader: Clarity and Credibility

This week, I am proposing 5 challenges facing modern leaders, and the respective competencies needed to face each challenge. If you like a specific post, please ‘like/favourite/share’ it. The post with the most amount of engagements will earn a follow up post outlining HOW TO DEVELOP COMPETENCIES RELATED TO THAT POST.

Clarity and Credibility

The second challenge modern leaders face is the ability to establish clarity and credibility. Are goals and intentions made clear? Do employees share their leaders’ vision. Has the leader established credibility?

And by credibility, I mean the implicit value attributed to the level of confidence the organization has in the leadership team’s ability. Specifically, it is the ability to navigate a chosen course to a safe and desirable destination, and the corresponding willingness of the members of the organization to fully invest themselves in making that journey.

The competencies needed for clarity and credibility are:

EQ- Emotional Intelligence. How you treat people; how you read and empathize with their emotions. This is HUGE.
DMQ- Decision Making Intelligence. The ability to frame and resolve wicked challenges.

Interested in how to develop EQ and DMQ? Like this post on Facebook or Twitter to warrant a detailed follow up post!

Intelligent Risk Taking

Credibility is not only poorly managed in most organizations, it is also poorly understood amongst the members of most senior leadership teams. This is despite the fact that credibility is essential to getting people to follow, to take intelligent risks, to innovate and to drive themselves forward aggressively, especially in turbulent conditions. Credibility is the essential lubricant of high performance and, while it can be influenced by any number of things, the two most important drivers of the credibility currency are the quality of the decisions made by individual leaders and/or the senior team collectively, and the way in which relationships are built and nourished, at all levels, over time.

The Currency of Credibility

Credibility is the currency we use to measure individual, organizational and leadership team effectiveness. Credibility is like a stock price. It rises and falls over time according to what the market (in this case, the people in the organization) determines it to be. Determining leadership credibility is not the result of measuring employee engagement or employee satisfaction. It is much deeper, much more complex and far more important. It is the implicit value attributed to the level of confidence the organization has in the leadership team’s ability. Specifically, it is the ability to navigate a chosen course to a safe and desirable destination, and the corresponding willingness of the members of the organization to fully invest themselves in making that journey.