A Whole New Way of Thinking

30 January 2018

Can you feel it? We’re in transition.
For years, many of us in the business world have been talking about the profound shift in the nature of business that is inevitably due to happen. Well, it has finally arrived.
In economic terms, we are well into the so called fourth economy, which has also been dubbed the “Experience Economy”. At the turn of the 20th century, we focused almost exclusively on the nature of the product or service, its features and benefits. Later, we began to shift our focus to how the product or service was delivered. Today, organizations are faced with what could be the most daunting task of all, focusing on the product AND how it is delivered.
Customers are no longer just demanding a top notch product.
They are no longer just seeking first class customer service.
They are demanding both. Right now. Wrapped in an amazing customer experience.
There has been a shift in attitude, mindset and approach and, for some time now, a small core of people inside most organizations have known this shift was happening. They understood what it encompassed, and what it meant. However, until now, there hasn’t been an understanding of how to actually achieve it.
In organizational terms, this new era is being called the “Conceptual Age”. Operationally, it means the requisite skill sets of workers will be based on the highly-conceptual, high-touch abilities. It requires a whole new kind of thinking, a whole new creativity, a whole new mindset. How, in a world of numbers, processes, and metrics, can organizations tap into the emotions of their customers, to deliver this elusive experience?
The task may seem challenging, the answer may be simple.
Learn to unlearn.
Think of ways not to think.
Open your mind to new possibilities.

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